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1996 - 2006

Child Advocacy International has worked in partnership with the Lions Clubs of Great Britain and Ireland since shortly after it was set up and the Lions have obtained three grants, of $25,000, $75,000, and $250,000, from the Association's International Charitable Foundation, LCIF, to assist in the evacuation and treatment of youngsters, and, in the coming year,the provision of intensive care and special care beds for hospitals in Mostar and Sarajevo.


Professor David Southall founded Child Advocacy International in 1995

LCIF GRANTS
1996 - $250,000 Major Catastrophe Grant towards the development of Paediatric Intensive Care Units in the Hospitals of East and West Mostar

1997 - $500,000 Major Catastrophe Grant to develop the Lion Intensive Care Unit at the Kosevo University Hospital, Sarajevo

1998 - $250,000 Major Catastrophe Grant for the same project - The Lion Intensive Care Unit at the Kosevo University Hospital, Sarajevo
A Further $50,000 Major Catastrophe Grant to complete the Lion Intensive Care Unit at the Kosevo University Hospital, Sarajevo and to upgrade the adjoining Maternity Unit
A Further $60,000 Major Catastrophe Grant to improve hospital services in Bihac,to provide a mobile clinic and simple literature in Gorazde as well as provide a small Childrens Unit in Gorazde Hospital

PROJECTS

1998

The Mostar Project

Proposed development of 4 intensive care and 2 high dependency care beds for new born infants and children in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

In West Mostar at the Bijlei Brijeg Childrens Department there was a well staffed and effectively functioning pediatric unit with a number of very able consultant pediatricians and junior hospital doctor staff.
In East Mostar at the Brankovac Children's hospital there had been an extremely poorly equipped and almost destroyed health centre which had provided inpatient care for sick children.
In collaboration with UNICEF and Child Advocacy International/Keele University, the EU Administration had been renovating this health centre and converting it into a centre for mother and child health including a delivery suite and emergency caesarean section operating theatre. However, there was only one senior and one junior pediatrician in East Mostar caring for more than 12,000 children.


The Proposal was to carry out the following work:

1. Using existing ward areas in the West Mostar Hospital (Bijeli Brijeg Hospital) one area to contain 2 beds enabling the provision of very high quality modern neonatal intensive care for new born infants born either prematurely or with complications relating to their birth or intrauterine development.
We also provide in a converted ward area, very close to the neonatal intensive care beds, an area containing 2 beds that provides intensive care for older infants and children.
These 4 intensive care beds contain up to date monitoring equipment and facilities to provide assisted ventilation and circulatory support for children from both East and West Mostar and the surrounding area of Bosnia and Herzegovina.
The equipment provided was identical to that used in the North Staffordshire Hospital at Keele University. We trained pediatricians from Mostar in the North Staffordshire Hospital which meant that following their training in the UK they would be able to immediately use the new equipment in their own hospital.

Within the newly refurbished Maternal and Child Health Centre in East Mostar we equipped 2 beds for the high dependence care of both infants and children. Facilities to initiate assisted ventilation was available but if this form of treatment was required for any length of time it was expected children would be transferred to West Mostar for further care. Should staffing significantly improve in East Mostar it would be relatively straight forward to upgrade the equipment on the East to convert these high dependency beds into intensive care beds. However, hopefully with improving integration of the city and improving freedom of movement this would not be necessary.
Mostar Project Proposals

2004

GORAZDE

Gorazde Childrens Department - Equipment provided to enable the establishment of a general paediatric ward

TRAINING

1997-1999 Mostar East and West - Training of doctors and nurses in paediatric and neonatal intensive care. Sarajevo Oncology Department - Training staff in the management of cancer in children in house at Sarajevo and at Alder Hay Childrens Hospital in Liverpool. This training included specialized input into the insertion of Hickman catheters for long term intravenous drug administration

1998-2006 Sarajevo Childrens Hospital - Training of Doctors and Nurses in Paediatric and neonatal intensive care, BLS (Basic Life Support) and ALPS (Advanced Paediatric Life Support)

1998 Sarajevo Maternity Hospital - On going training in BLS (Basic Life Support) and APLS (Advanced Paediatric Life Support) in the Maternity and Neonatal Departments

2004-2006 Gorazde Childrens Department - Training of Doctors and Nurses in basic peadiatric and neonatal care.

Lion Magazine Articles

1996 - Oct/Nov - Building Bridges for Children

1997 - Aug/Sep - The Gift for Living Goes On

1999 - His Life Your Gift

1999 - Oct/Nov - Lions - Your Gift goes on into the Millennium

2004 - Your Gift - Their Lives

2005 - A Gift for Living

2006 - Oct/Nov - The Gift of Lions


IF YOU WANT TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF
'A GIFT FOR LIVING' BY MAKING A DONATION THEN PLEASE GO TO OUR APPEALS PAGE.


contact@lionsclubsinternational-agiftforliving.org.uk : Links : Charity Number:107041